Career path

Employment in NJ

Average NJ Salary

Educational Requirement

Education Level

Medical Assistant Medical Assistants oversee patient records, prescriptions, and other medical information, although some focus on clinical work involving physical examinations and blood tests. 11,660 $32,620 Completion of a Medical Assistant program at a vocational-technical school, postsecondary vocational-technical school, and/or community college; must be certified by the American Association of Medical Assistants or the American Association of Medical Technologists. High school / vocational technical school
Physician Physicians examine patients, and recommend treatments and tests to detect and cure illnesses. 8,970 $167,720 4 years of undergraduate school, 4 years of medical school, and 3 to 8 years of internship and residency; must be licensed by the New Jersey State Board of Medical Examiners. Graduate and Post Graduate
Physician Assistant Physician Assistants help doctors examine and test patients. They help maintain patient records, make preliminary diagnosis, recommend treatment, and conduct simple medical procedures. 950 $88,850 Master's degree preferred in an accredited Physician Assistant program; must be licensed by the New Jersey State Board of Medical Examiners. Graduate and Post Graduate
Surgical Technician Surgical Technicians set up operating rooms in advance of medical procedures to assist surgeons, nurses, and medical staff. 1,380 $43,620 High school/vocational-technical degree; completion of certificate in Surgical Technology program at community college, vocational-technical school, hospital, or the military. High school/ vocational technical school
Surgical Technologists Surgical technologists assist in surgical operations. They work under the supervision of surgeons, registered nurses and other surgical personnel. They prepare patients for surgery, send specimens to a laboratory for analysis and operate some equipment. $37,540 Vocational/Technical schools, hospitals or community colleges. Certificate or degree in surgical technology. Associate's degree
Genetic Counselor Health professionals with specialized graduate degrees and experience in the areas of medical genetics and counseling. Most enter the field from a variety of disciplines, including biology, genetics, nursing, psychology, public health and social work 380 $71,800 In order to become a Certified Genetic Counselor (CGC©), one must obtain a Master’s degree in Genetic Counseling from an ACGC Accredited Program. Once all requirements have been met, one may apply and sit for the Certification Examination. Master's Degree
Perfusionist The person who operates the heart-lung machine is called a cardiac perfusionist. If the patient requires additional blood products or medications during the procedure, the perfusionist can administer these through the heart-lung machine. The perfusionist also monitors and controls the patient’s body temperature by increasing or decreasing the temperature of the patient’s blood as it passes through the machine. 1,050 $66,700 Perfusionists typically complete a four-year degree plus specialized training to satisfy the requirements of certification. The Certified Clinical Perfusionist (CCP) credential is administered by the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion. Bachelor's Degree
Orthotics and Prosthetics Health care workers who specialize in orthotics and prosthetics (O&P) help these patients regain their mobility by fitting them with artificial limbs (prostheses) and orthopedic braces (orthoses). 150 $71,300 Orthotists and prosthetists need at least a master’s degree in orthotics and prosthetics and certification before entering the field. Both orthotists and prosthetists must complete a 1-year residency before they can be certified. Master’s degree
Chiropractor Chiropractic doctors diagnose and treat patients whose health problems are associated with the body's muscular, nervous, and skeletal systems. Chiropractors believe that interference with these systems can impair normal functioning, cause pain, and lower resistance to disease. They are most well known for the hands-on technique they practice to adjust imbalances in the patient's skeletal system, particularly the spine. 1,320 $82,600 Becoming a chiropractor requires earning a Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) degree and getting a state license. Doctor of Chiropractic programs take 4 years to complete and require 3 years of previous undergraduate college education for admission. Doctoral or Professional Degree
Naturopathic Doctor Naturopathic physicians combine the wisdom of nature with the rigors of modern science. Steeped in traditional healing methods, principles and practices, naturopathic medicine focuses on holistic, proactive prevention and comprehensive diagnosis and treatment. By using protocols that minimize the risk of harm, naturopathic physicians help facilitate the body’s inherent ability to restore and maintain optimal health. It is the naturopathic physician’s role to identify and remove barriers to good health by helping to create a healing internal and external environment. 1,890 $82,600 A licensed naturopathic physician (ND) attends a four-year, graduate-level naturopathic medical school and is educated in all of the same basic sciences as an MD, but also studies holistic and nontoxic approaches to therapy with a strong emphasis on disease prevention and optimizing wellness. In addition to a standard medical curriculum, the naturopathic physician also studies clinical nutrition, homeopathic medicine, botanical medicine, psychology, and counseling. A naturopathic physician takes rigorous professional board exams so that he or she may be licensed by a state or jurisdiction as a primary care general practice physician. Doctoral or Professional Degree
Disaster Medical Specialist Disaster medicine is a fairly new specialty for doctors who want to be “first on the scene” of an emergency that involves mass injury or illness. Physicians who specialize in disaster medicine also help hospitals and government agencies design effective disaster response and recovery plans. $101,000 Disaster medicine is a newly recognized medical specialty, so there are not many programs focused specifically on training for this field. You must first complete college and medical school, then a residency in a medical or surgical specialty to become a medical doctor. Doctoral or Professional Degree/ Training
Emergency Medicine Disaster medicine is a fairly new specialty for doctors who want to be “first on the scene” of an emergency that involves mass injury or illness. Physicians who specialize in disaster medicine also help hospitals and government agencies design effective disaster response and recovery plans. $200,000 Disaster medicine is a newly recognized medical specialty, so there are not many programs focused specifically on training for this field. You must first complete college and medical school, then a residency in a medical or surgical specialty to become a medical doctor. Doctoral or Professional Degree
Osteopathic Physician Osteopathic physicians (Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine or D.O.s) diagnose illness and injury, prescribe and administer treatment, and advise patients about how to prevent and manage disease. Like their M.D. counterparts, they are fully licensed to diagnose, treat, prescribe medications, and perform surgery in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Today, more than 20 percent of all U.S. medical students are studying at a college of osteopathic medicine. In addition to using all of the tools and technology available to modern medicine, D.O.s have a strongly holistic philosophy and practice osteopathic manipulative medicine - a distinctive system of hands-on diagnosis and treatment which focuses specifically on the musculoskeletal system. $200,000 The minimum educational requirement for entry into medical school is 3 years of college, although most applicants have at least a bachelor's degree, and many have advanced degrees. For an overview of typical prerequisites, see the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) website. Doctoral or Professional Degree
Pathologist The pathologist is a physician who specializes in the diagnosis and management of human disease by laboratory methods Pathologists function in three broad areas; as diagnosticians, as teachers, and as investigators. Fundamental to the discipline of pathology is the need to integrate clinical information with physiological, biochemical and molecular laboratory studies, together with observations of tissue alterations. Pathologists in hospital and clinical laboratories practice as consultant physicians, developing and applying knowledge of tissue and laboratory analyses to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of individual patients. As teachers, they impart this knowledge of disease to their medical colleagues, to medical students, and to trainees at all levels. As scientists, they use the tools of laboratory science in clinical studies, disease models, and other experimental systems, to advance the understanding and treatment of disease. $137,000 After completing the requisite 4 years of medical school, pathologists conduct another 4 to 5 years of residency training before they are eligible to take board certification examinations. Many pathologists also undertake additional training in a subspecialty of pathology. Doctoral or Professional Degree
Chiropractic Assistants Chiropractic assistants (CAs) and technicians assist in the care of patients in chiropractic clinic settings. Assistants and technicians may assist the chiropractor with various clinic responsibilities, patient tests and treatments. Areas of Specialization Chiropractic technicians have an opportunity to work in a variety of practices that deal with specific populations, such as the elderly and children, or specific areas such as chiropractic radiology. Work Environment Chiropractic assistants might be assigned the following positions: front-desk receptionist, back-office or therapy assistant, exam or x-ray technician, insurance and collections clerk, office or public relations manager, and new-patient advocate. $25,063 Chiropractic assistants who administer clinical functions may be required to obtain licensure. To obtain a license, you're often required to pass a state exam or become certified by the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE). Certification / Licenses